The Oregon Faith Report - Faith News from Oregon

Archive

Homeschooling: Fastest-Growing Form of Education

August 30, 2010 --

Homeschooling: The Fastest-Growing Form of Education in the U.S.

It appears that in the U.S., homeschooling is the fastest-growing form of education, according to independent research conducted by organizations ranging from the National Home Education Research Institute (www.nheri.org), a nonprofit research and educational organization, to the federally funded National Center for Education Statistics (www.nces.ed.gov).

Let’s take a look at some of the evidence:

* “Homeschooling grew from 1.7% of the school age population in 1999 to 2.9% in 2007, a 74% relative increase over 8 years,” states Dr. Brian D. Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI).

* A 2008 study found that “an estimated 2.0 to 2.5 million K-12 children were home educated in the U.S. during mid-2008,” statistics that were also confirmed by NCES.

Read the full article and discuss it »

Eat, Pray, Love helps revive faith memoirs

August 29, 2010 --

By Steve Rabey
Religion News Service

(RNS) Believers have been writing about their spiritual journeys ever since St. Augustine invented the autobiography 16 centuries ago. Today, spiritual memoirs are enjoying a popular resurrection.

Exhibit A is Elizabeth Gilbert’s “Eat, Pray, Love,” which describes Gilbert’s midlife meltdown and her subsequent yearlong global quest for food, salvation and sex. Published in 2006, the book has sold some 8 million copies.“I used to have this appetite for my life, and it is just gone,” says actress Julia Roberts, who plays Gilbert in the film adaptation that opens Friday (Aug. 13). “I want to go somewhere where I can marvel at something.”

Fans of Gilbert’s book will be among those watching for how the film handles the book’s creative take on two classic elements of spiritual memoirs: the inner quest for spiritual transformation and the outward pilgrimage to faraway places—in this case Italy (for food), India (to study and meditate with a guru) and Bali (for romance).

Read the full article and discuss it »

Local churches press Family Day to get everyone back to dinner table

August 28, 2010 --

Parishes encouraged to promote Family Day
By Portland Archdiocese

Parishes in the Archdiocese of Portland are being encouraged to promote Family Day. September 27 is the tenth anniversary of “Family Day – A Day to Eat Dinner with your Children.” This celebration was started in 2001 by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA), which found that the more often children had dinner with their parents the less likely they were to use drugs or alcohol.

Ideas to help families celebrate Family Day include:

* Spending time with children having dinner together;

* Talking to children about their friends, interests and the dangers of drugs and alcohol;

* Listening to children and answering questions they might have on drugs, alcohol and tobacco;

* Recognizing that parents have the power to help keep their children substance abuse free.

Read the full article and discuss it »

Family-Faith Film Review: Takers

August 27, 2010 --

Family-Faith Film Review: Takers
By Catholic Office of Film and Broadcasting

Takers—Crime drama that devolves into a cliched exercise in gunfire, explosions and insipid dialogue. Director and co-writer John Luessenhop tells the story of a gang of five skilled thieves (Idris Elba, Paul Walker, Chris Brown, Michael Ealy and Hayden Christensen) joined, on his release from prison, by a former cohort (Tip “T.I.” Harris) with a plan for the highly engineered robbery of an armored truck. Giving chase is a grumpy Los Angeles police detective (Matt Dillon). Constant stylized gun violence, an instance of male rear nudity, and pervasive crude and fleeting profane and crass language.  A-III — adults. (PG-13) 2010.

Read the full article and discuss it »

Family-Faith Film Review: The Last Exorcism

--

Family-Faith Film Review: The Last Exorcism
By Catholic Office of Film and Broadcasting

The Last Exorcism—Middling fright fest about an evangelical minister and self-confessed charlatan (Patrick Fabian) who brings a film crew (led by Iris Bahr) along to document his final faked exorcism. But he gets more than he bargained for when the Louisiana farm girl (Ashley Bell) whose father (Louis Herthum) summoned him shows signs of genuine possession. While the gore factor is kept comparatively low in director Daniel Stamm’s gothic outing — which toys cleverly with the modern presumption that all phenomena can be explained scientifically — the preacher’s corrosive cynicism and the occult atmosphere by which he unexpectedly finds himself surrounded make this inappropriate for all but well-grounded and judicious adult viewers. Complex treatment of religion, sacrilegious activity, some gruesome images, at least two uses of profanity, brief sexual talk, and references to incest and homosexuality. L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. (PG-13) 2010

Read the full article and discuss it »

Poll shows Americans view of mosque debate

--

Majority Oppose Proposed Islamic Center and Mosque in NYC, But Support Mosque in Own Local Community
Majority say former site of World Trade Center is ‘Sacred Ground’
By Public Religion Research Institute

WASHINGTON, D.C.—As the debate over building a Muslim community center and mosque in lower Manhattan rages on, new research from Public Religion Research Institute shows that a majority of Americans (56%) say that the former site of the World Trade Center is ‘sacred ground,’ and 57% are opposed to allowing the proposed Islamic community center and mosque to be built two blocks away. However, three-in-four (76%) Americans—including majorities of religious groups across the spectrum—say they would support the building of a mosque in their own local community.

“Despite recent stories that seemed to indicate widespread opposition to mosques around the country, our survey shows Americans are making a distinction between the proposed Islamic community center and mosque in New York City and mosques in their local communities,” said Dr. Robert P. Jones, CEO of Public Religion Research Institute. “While a majority oppose the building in Manhattan, three-in-four Americans say they would support Muslims in their local communities building a mosque.”

Read the full article and discuss it »

Census riles 65% of Oregonians says poll

August 26, 2010 --

Oregon faith Report Online Poll,

Most Oregonians consider the Census process an uncomfortable experience according to an Oregon Faith Report online straw poll.   The question asked was “In filling out the 2010 census, did you feel comfortable/uncomfortable on the questions asked?” with 65% saying uncomfortable, 21% comfortable and 14% undecided.   This is terrible public relations nearly one out of five customers come away with a negative experience.

Read the full article and discuss it »

Church Girls Gone…Mild?

August 25, 2010 --

Church Girls Gone…Mild?
Paul Coughlin,
Oregon author of No More Christian Nice Girls

No book on the Christian Nice Girl problem would be complete without looking at how the church socializes girls and women.  Rather than trying to resolve every “hot button” doctrinal issue related to gender, such as whether women should serve as pastors, here’s a simple observation that rings true for many female believers: the “sugar and spice” expectations and pressures that women face are often even worse inside than outside the church’s walls.  Some churches don’t allow women to be involved in any form of leadership, unless it’s singing on the worship team or teaching children.  This means that the important insights and contributions available from women’s God-given, intuitive, empathetic minds are under-valued, unheard, and unheeded.  In other churches, when women are encouraged to be more assertive and expressive, it’s often highly compartmentalized.  Being animated and spirited is okay—but only during worship.  It’s good to be courageous—when sharing the gospel.  It’s right to be firm—when disciplining your children.

Read the full article and discuss it »

Family-Faith Film Review: The Switch

August 24, 2010 --

Family-Faith Film Review: The Switch
By Catholic Office of Film and Broadcasting

The Switch—Seven years after his unmarried best friend (Jennifer Aniston) conceived a son (Thomas Robinson) by artificial insemination, and left town to raise the boy, a successful but neurotic New York stock trader (Jason Bateman) reconnects with her. Struck by the parallels between his personality and the lad’s, he gradually recollects that, while drunk, he accidentally spilled the intended donor’s (Patrick Wilson) “contribution” down a bathroom sink. Then, in a panic, he substituted his own. The film showcases some of the tangled emotional complications brought about by severing conception from its divinely intended source and setting, the bond of marital love. But co-directors Will Speck and Josh Gordon’s frequently distasteful comedy of modern manners, adapted from Jeffrey Eugenides’ 1996 short story “Baster,” takes as a given of contemporary life its heroine’s right to engineer such a rupture. Lost in the moral confusion are touching scenes of paternal love and a fine comic turn by Jeff Goldblum as Bateman’s perpetually flustered business partner. Benign view of artificial insemination, off-screen masturbation, rear and blurred frontal nudity, much sexual humor, at least one use of the S-word, some crass language. O – morally offensive. (PG-13) 2010

Read the full article and discuss it »

Family-Faith Film Review: Lottery Ticket

--

Family-Faith Film Review: Lottery Ticket
By Catholic Office of Film and Broadcasting

Lottery Ticket—Broad comedy centers on a hardworking, good-natured 18-year-old (rapper Bow Wow) from an Atlanta housing project who wins the lottery but must survive a long holiday weekend before he can collect. He must evade the wiles of a menacing thug (Gbenga Akinnagbe) and a natty crime boss (Mike Epps) with the help of a retired boxer (Ice Cube) for whom he runs errands. Director Erik White’s efforts to bridge materialism and spiritual growth are awkward, and viewers seeking an entertaining and perceptive social satire will be disappointed. Nongraphic nonmarital sexual activity, much profanity, at least one use of the F-word, frequent crude and crass language, numerous sexual and contraception references and some violence. L — limited adult audience, films whose problematic content many adults would find troubling. (PG-13) 2010

Read the full article and discuss it »
« OlderArchives

Subscribe to Weekly Updates

Oregon Religion News Ticker

Top Business News

 

Top Women's News

 

Top Natural Resource News

 

Top Faith News

 

Copyright © 2014, OregonReport. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use - Copyright - Legal Policy | Contact Oregon Report

Stay Tuned...

Stay up to date with the latest political news and commentary from Oregon Faith Report through weekly email updates:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Prefer another subscription option? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, become a fan on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

RSS Twitter Facebook

No Thanks (close this box)